T-SQL Tuesday #137: Using Notebooks Every Day

Jupyter Notebooks

I first heard about Jupyter Notebooks years ago. At the time I was just getting started in Python and I thought these were a great way to share code online with others. However, the setup and administration was a pain, and I quickly gave up.

When I saw Microsoft add notebooks to Azure, I got slightly excited again, but once again, it was a bit of a pain to work with these. Too much administrative overhead, in my opinion.

That changed a bit with Azure Data Studio, which has seen notebooks get added, and become easier and more stable. If you haven’t tried notebooks, get ADS and give it a try today. I even wrote a short piece on using these.

Your Invitation

For this month’s T-SQL Tuesday, I want you to write about how you have used, or would like to use, a Jupyter notebook. This seemed to be exciting for many people at first, but I haven’t seen a lot of uptake from users in general. So I’m curious if you are using them.

A few resources for you:

There is even a way to run these from PowerShell.

So let me know how you are using notebooks, or your plans for the future.

T-SQL Tuesday #136 – Blog About Your Favorite Data Type (Or Least Favorite)

Invitation and wrap-up from Brent Ozar.

Your mission: write a blog post about your favorite data type, and schedule it for next Tuesday, March 9.

Mad about money? Feverish about float? Tell us what you use your favorite data type for, and what people need to know before they get started using it. Data types have so many interesting edge cases, like when Aaron Bertrand taught us to use lower case for our data types. (I still don’t do that, but for the record, I do feel guilty.)

T-SQL Tuesday #135 – The outstanding tools of the trade that make your job awesome

Invitation and write-up from Mikey Bronowski

TL;DR

Without tools, most of the work would be much harder to do or could not be done at all. Write a blog post about the most helpful and effective tools you use or know of.

If you do not own the blog – Tweet your contribution or post on LinkedIn with #tsql2sday and put the link back in the comments here.

Tools are great

Can you imagine your day without them? How do you make your coffee or slice the bread? How do you cook breakfast or dinner?

We are surrounded by tools, and there is a special class of them called “tools of the trade”. Those are needed to do your job whatever it is.

I would like you to write about the tools that help you at work, those that helped you the most or were the most effective. It can by anything really, does not have to be related to SQL at all. Here is the list of example, but you can go beyond that and share the tools you cannot live without. Are you…

  • writing code?
  • recording videos or streaming live sessions?
  • creating podcasts or taking pictures?
  • migrating loads of data or environments?
  • writing documentation?
  • maintaining the open-source projects?
  • managing the team?
  • travelling a lot (well, not currently)?
  • learning a new language?
  • renovating house?

Everyone has its own experience and workstyle. The goal of this post is for everyone to learn about a new tool, or starting to use one, so life gets easier a little bit.

T-SQL TUESDAY #134: – GIVE ME A BREAK!

Invitation and roundup from James McGillivray.

Breaks are critical for our mental health. Write a post about relaxation techniques, dream destinations, vacation plans or anything else relating to taking a break for your own mental health.

TAKING A BREAK

2020 was a tough year. And there’s no guarantee that 2021 will be better. Hopefully it is, or at the very least, hopefully our experience in surviving 2020 will allow us to be more prepared.

In the early months of the pandemic, I was burning myself out. South Africa was in a hard lockdown, and we were prohibited from doing many of the things I usually do outside of work. Sport, exercise (outside the house), socialising, and choir were all banned. Additionally, my wife is an Emergency Physician, and at a high-risk of becoming infected, so we isolated at home as much as we possibly could.

With all this time on my hands, and no sport on TV, I started working crazy hours to keep myself occupied. And even when I wasn’t working, I was spending time in front of a screen; watching TV, browsing social media, even having a chat with my parents or friends was happening in front of a screen.

Before long, I was feeling lethargic, listless, and honestly, very down. I was struggling to provide emotional support for my wife when she needed it most, and I realized I was burned out. I knew that I needed to change something… which I will write about next week (but here are some pictures to whet your appetite).

YOUR TURN

For T-SQL Tuesday #133, I’d like to know about your own views on vacations, escapes or other breaks. Whether it’s work, technology, or any other situation that you need to get away from. Plans, memories, or relaxing activities, I want them all!

You can choose any of the topics below, or any other variation on the theme.

  • What do you do to take a break when you’re stuck at home?
  • How do you switch off, and get away from being connected 24/7?
  • If money was no issue, what would be your bucket list vacation?
  • What vacation are you dreaming of taking once it is safe to do?
  • What is the best vacation you’ve ever had?