T-SQL Tuesday #095 – Big Data

Invitation  and roundup from Derik Hammer.

This month’s topic: Big Data

Big data is both a buzzword, or phrase, and a booming area of technology. Technical professionals and companies alike are investing a lot in big data and I want to hear your thoughts on the topic. Your post can be about; how big data affects the industry and our careers, how the cloud is enhancing our ability to work with big data, how you deal with big data in SQL Server on-premises, NoSQL, development challenges and strategies for working with internet of things data, or anything else you come up with. Big data has become quite large (pun intended) and should offer a lot of freedom for self-expression in this month’s posts.

The rules

  1. Write a post on the topic above.
  2. Schedule the post to go live on Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 between 00:00 and 23:59 UTC.
  3. Include the TSQL Tuesday logo in the top of your post.
  4. Link the post back to this one and comment on this post advertising your post.
  5. Optional, but encouraged: Tweet a link to your post using the #tsql2sday hash tag on Twitter

Extra credit

Blend your topic with emerging technologies. Some examples:

  • Work with big data in Microsoft’s new Azure Cosmos DB.
  • Show how new SQL Server 2017 features impact big data in SQL Server.
  • Show how R and Polybase can use big data for predictive analytics.

Let’s All Get PoSh – What are you going to automate today for T-SQL Tuesday #094

The current invitation (September 2017) is for T-SQL Tuesday #94. Invitation  and Get-PostRoundup from Rob Sewell.

What are you going to automate today?

PowerShellIt is no surprise to those that know me that I will choose PowerShell as the topic for this month. I am passionate about PowerShell because it has enabled me to have the career I have today and to visit numerous countries all around the world, meet people and talk about PowerShell. By my reckoning searching the TSQL Tuesday website it has been over 3 years since we had a topic specific to PowerShell. So I would like you to blog about PowerShell and SQL Server (or other interesting data platform products)

If you don’t know or use PowerShell GREAT! That’s awesome.

Please spend an hour or so with it and tell us how you got on and what and how you learned. Just like Erik and Brent did. You could install one of the community modules like dbatools, dbareports , SQLDiagAPI  or the Microsoft ones sqlserver or SSRS and try them out and tell us what you learned.

To participate:

  1. Write a post on the topic below
  2. Schedule the post to go live on Tuesday, September 12th (between zero am and midnight, UTC)
  3. Include the TSQL Tuesday logo in the top of your post
  4. Link the post back to this one (it’s easier if you comment on this post and link it)
  5. Optional: Tweet a link to your post using the #tsql2sday hash tag on Twitter

T-SQL Tuesday #093 – Interviewing Patterns & Anti-Patterns

Invitation and advice from the community from Kendra Little.

What advice do you have for people preparing for or going throughn interview?

Feel free to be creative on this topic. Take whichever approach you like best:

  • You may focus on patterns to follow for success
  • You may list anti-patterns, too: things that might seem like a good idea, but are a recipe for disaster
  • You can write about your own highs and lows as a candidate or as an interviewer
  • Be as specific as you want for interviewing for or hiring for your given skillset, whether you’re a developer, DBA, manager, consultant, or something else entirely

Whichever route you take, it’s probably a good idea to disguise the identities of past employers, candidates, etc.

Personally, I’m going to take the approach of writing about an interview for a SQL Server position that I completely bombed as a candidate, and why it ended up being one of the best learning experiences of my life (although it was painful at the time). It taught me a lot about successful interviewing patterns.

I can’t wait to learn about YOUR interviewing patterns and anti-patterns as well.

Get ready, get set, get blogging!

T-SQL Tuesday #92, Lessons learned the hard way

Current Invitation and roundup from Raul Gonzalez.

For this month, I want you peers to write about those important lessons that you learned the hard way, for instance something you did and put your systems down or maybe something you didn’t do and took your systems down. It can be also a bad decision you or someone else took back in the day and you’re still paying for it…

There are so many things to share here so everybody can learn from each others mistakes, because all of us were once a beginner and no one is born with any knowledge about SQL Server.

Please do not be ashamed of sharing your experiences, you can anonymize the whole story if you want but remember all people make mistakes, the important is to learn from them and try not to repeat them in the future.

T-SQL Tuesday #091 – Databases and DevOps

Invitation  and roundup from Grant Fritchey.

Implementing DevOps with databases presents a unique set of challenges. However, just because something might be hard doesn’t mean that it shouldn’t be done.

I had the opportunity to work with a team of developers, database developers and DBAs under a management team that all agreed on the common goal we had, delivering more, better performing applications, faster. We didn’t know it at the time, but we were doing DevOps.

DevOps gets a bad name because, well, the problems that DevOps sets out to solve, poor communication, bad teamwork, dysfunctional development and badly configured and maintained processes, are  done by the same team that attempts to implement DevOps. However, they look on it as a purely mechanical switch that they throw, assign some poor person to the role of DevOps Coordinator (or something) and then maintain the status quo in regards to their culture and approach to software. Shocking that implementing this doesn’t work.

Then, toss in databases with the whole issues around persistence, and things go nuts.

This then, is my choice for T-SQL Tuesday. How do we approach DevOps as developers, DBAs, report writers, analysts and database developers? How do we deal with data persistence, process, source control and all the rest of the tools and mechanisms, and most importantly, culture, that would enable us to get better, higher functioning teams put together? Please, tell me your DevOps stories.

T-SQL Tuesday #090 – Shipping Database Changes

Invitation and wrap up from James Anderson.

I was once asked to add a new feature to an application. It was installed on multiple SQL Server instances across multiple physical sites. The problem was that different instances of the application had different database schemas. New code may work on my local schema, but it could fail on the different schemas in live.

To develop the feature, I knew that I needed one universal version of the database schema.

I merged the schemas into a version that met the requirements of all environments and redeployed. Once in source control, this schema became the single source of truth that all future deployments were built from.

Not only did this solve my problem, it served as the foundation for the automation of builds, tests and deployments.

I’ve been interested in Continuous Integration and Database Lifecycle Management ever since. For more details, check my series of posts that start with SQL Server & Continuous Integration.

For this T-SQL Tuesday, I’d like to hear about your thoughts or experiences with database deployments.

Read the rules below and join in by publishing a short post about database deployments. If you develop or deploy database changes, I want to hear about it.

Your post can cover anything related to database deployments, but if you need inspiration, feel free to cover any of the topics below:

T-SQL Tuesday #089 – The times they are a-changing

Invitation and roundup from Koen VerBeeck.

This months topic is inspired by the blog post Will the Cloud Eat My DBA Job? by Kendra Little. Technology has changed a lot in the past years, especially with cloud/globalization/automation. What an impact has this had on your job? Do you feel endangered? Or do you have more exciting features/toys to work with? Do you embrace the change and learn new skills? Or do you hide in your cubicle and fear the robot uprising? Let us know how you handle all these changes, or how you feel there are no changes at all for your current job. I’m looking forward to learn how you feel about the future of data management/analysis and how you plan to deal with it.

T-SQL Tuesday #088 – The daily (database-related) WTF

Invitation from Kennie Pontoppidan.

The daily (database-related) WTF

Be inspired by the IT horror stories from http://thedailywtf.com, and tell your own daily WTF story. The truly original way developers generated SQL in project X. Or what the grumpy “DBA” imposed on people in project Y. Or how the architect did truly weird “database design” on project Z

One of my favorite dailyWTF stories is the on about the BIG red button.

Could be that someone from within Amazon will tell that the true story of the AWS glitch last week was a T-SQL dynamic query gone bad.. Or that the HSBC online banking outage last month was as simple USE (wrong) database mistake. Or whatever you guys (or that guy over there) did.

2017 T-SQL Tuesdays

February – T-SQL Tuesday #87Fixing Old Problems with Shiny New Toys (roundup)

What I’d like to see from the blog responses for this T-SQL Tuesday is how you’ve used a “new” Microsoft data platform toy to fix an old problem. We’ll define new toys as something from SQL Server 2014’s release date until now. We’ll even accept a SQL Server vNext response if you’ve got one!

January – T-SQL Tuesday #86SQL Server Bugs and Enhancement Requests (roundup)

Find the most interesting bug or enhancement request (and it can be your own), and write a blog post about it

T-SQL Tuesday #87 –Fixing Old Problems with Shiny New Toys

Invitation and roundup from Matt Gordon.

While the SQL Server ecosystem is constantly evolving, it seems like that evolution has sped up considerably in the last year or two. From the constant improvements in Azure, to the rapid changes in Power BI, to the powerhouse release of SQL Server 2016 last year, those of us whose professional life resides within the SQL Server world have a multitude of new tools in our toolbox.

What I’d like to see from the blog responses for this T-SQL Tuesday is how you’ve used a “new” Microsoft data platform toy to fix an old problem. We’ll define new toys as something from SQL Server 2014’s release date until now. We’ll even accept a SQL Server vNext response if you’ve got one!

Did you work around a database design/performance issue by using memory-optimized tables and natively compiled stored procedures (brought to us in SQL 2014)? Did you use Power BI to present data visualizations to a client in a way you couldn’t have previously? Did you use SQL 2016’s mobile reporting ability to extend SSRS reports to a mobile client and solve an issue that way? Did you solve an archival issue by stretching your database into Azure? Basically, did you solve a data problem with a cool new Microsoft data platform toy?

I think many of us settle into old habits when it comes to solving problems with our data, so I can’t wait for the responses to this topic to see what cool new things people are doing to solve some old problems.