Let’s All Get PoSh – What are you going to automate today for T-SQL Tuesday #094

The current invitation (September 2017) is for T-SQL Tuesday #94. Invitation  and Get-PostRoundup from Rob Sewell.

What are you going to automate today?

PowerShellIt is no surprise to those that know me that I will choose PowerShell as the topic for this month. I am passionate about PowerShell because it has enabled me to have the career I have today and to visit numerous countries all around the world, meet people and talk about PowerShell. By my reckoning searching the TSQL Tuesday website it has been over 3 years since we had a topic specific to PowerShell. So I would like you to blog about PowerShell and SQL Server (or other interesting data platform products)

If you don’t know or use PowerShell GREAT! That’s awesome.

Please spend an hour or so with it and tell us how you got on and what and how you learned. Just like Erik and Brent did. You could install one of the community modules like dbatools, dbareports , SQLDiagAPI  or the Microsoft ones sqlserver or SSRS and try them out and tell us what you learned.

To participate:

  1. Write a post on the topic below
  2. Schedule the post to go live on Tuesday, September 12th (between zero am and midnight, UTC)
  3. Include the TSQL Tuesday logo in the top of your post
  4. Link the post back to this one (it’s easier if you comment on this post and link it)
  5. Optional: Tweet a link to your post using the #tsql2sday hash tag on Twitter

T-SQL Tuesday #92, Lessons learned the hard way

Current Invitation and roundup from Raul Gonzalez.

For this month, I want you peers to write about those important lessons that you learned the hard way, for instance something you did and put your systems down or maybe something you didn’t do and took your systems down. It can be also a bad decision you or someone else took back in the day and you’re still paying for it…

There are so many things to share here so everybody can learn from each others mistakes, because all of us were once a beginner and no one is born with any knowledge about SQL Server.

Please do not be ashamed of sharing your experiences, you can anonymize the whole story if you want but remember all people make mistakes, the important is to learn from them and try not to repeat them in the future.

T-SQL Tuesday #089 – The times they are a-changing

Invitation and roundup from Koen VerBeeck.

This months topic is inspired by the blog post Will the Cloud Eat My DBA Job? by Kendra Little. Technology has changed a lot in the past years, especially with cloud/globalization/automation. What an impact has this had on your job? Do you feel endangered? Or do you have more exciting features/toys to work with? Do you embrace the change and learn new skills? Or do you hide in your cubicle and fear the robot uprising? Let us know how you handle all these changes, or how you feel there are no changes at all for your current job. I’m looking forward to learn how you feel about the future of data management/analysis and how you plan to deal with it.

T-SQL Tuesday #063 – How Do You Manage Security?

Invitation and roundup from Ken Fisher.

I’m your host Kenneth Fisher and this month I’d thought we might talk about security. Security is one of those subjects that most DBAs have to deal with regardless of specialty. So as something we all have to work with at some point or another what are some tips you’d like to share? What’s the best security design? You’ve picked up a legacy system and the security is awful, how do you fix it? Any great tools out there you’d like to share? Hate it or love it I’m betting we all have something to say.

T-SQL Tuesday #062 – HealthySQL

Invitation and Roundup from Robert Pearl.

So, let’s get this blog party started, and kick off our international Healthy SQL campaign. Let’s spread the word to anyone and everyone managing a SQL Server Database infrastructure of the necessity to perform regular health checks on each SQL Server and repeat often.  The purpose here is to get database professionals, to ensure that all their SQL Servers are healthy, and can pass a health check. It also means that you can prove this (to heaven forbid, auditors), and back it up with documentation.

If you want to excel in your career as a data professional or DBA, then you need to be concerned about your companies’ SQLFitness.  Therefore, I am inviting all of you, to blog about your T-SQL Resolution, and describe what it is that you will do this year to make sure your SQL Servers are healthy and fit.  Now, it’s ok to ponder Healthy SQL in the abstract, but we’re looking for some technical tips on things a DBA should do to keep your SQL Servers performing well.

It could be something as simple as implementing a new monitoring software or script, updating all your SQL Servers to the latest version or service pack, setting up maintenance and optimization jobs, HA/DR, creating a performance baseline, capturing performance stats, (ie: DMV automation scripts, or MDW), a checklist ,etc.  Sky is the limit, as long as you can contribute something to the SQLCommunity that can be used in the effort to ensure SQL Fitness.

T-SQL Tuesday #061 – Giving Back

Invitation and roundup from Wayne Sheffield.

In “The Spirit of Giving”, I want to know how you plan on Giving Back to the SQL Community during the coming year. Are you going to start speaking at your local user group? Speak at your local SQL Saturday? Perhaps step up and help run your local user group? Do you want to start becoming an active blogger – or increase your blogging? Do you plan on volunteering your time with larger organizations (such as PASS), so that SQL Training can occur at a larger level? However you plan on giving back to the SQL Community during the upcoming year, and whether it is something new that you’ll be doing or continuing what you are doing, I’m looking forward to reading about it in your blog post.

T-SQL Tuesday #060 – Something New Learned

Invitation and roundup from Chris Yates.

So, here it is. I put the challenge out to discuss something new learned last week. I was fortunate enough to attend the PASS Summit last week in Seattle. While this post will not be my summarization of that trip (that will be another post) I did have several take-a-ways. I sat in some stellar sessions with some renowned speakers.

However, one re-occurring theme kept coming to my mind – the people. Listen, I’ve been through a lot over my 15 years with SQL, and my 3 years actively involved in the community and this past week affirmed something for me. LISTEN to the people.

I place strong value in the sessions I attended; along with that I have to note that face time; one on one time with real people in my industry is about the best form of learning I could ever hope to obtain.

With that learning comes in issues related to both SQL and non SQL attributes. I had so many positive conversations on leadership alone that sparked a new kind of fire within me; one that was not as bright as what my technical fire had been.

Guys, listen. I could write 10 blog posts on how buffer size could help with backups, the need to have always on implemented, or how to tune indexes all day long. The people, better yet the community is where I believe the learning lies within. Out of 5k people last week I ended up meeting a guy that works two blocks from me and we got to discuss the community and what it means to us.

Have you challenged yourself lately? I mean have you really challenged yourself lately in learning something. I don’t care if you are just starting out or the most seasoned vet around; the ability to learn happens everyday and I’m learning that is what separates the exceptional data professional from the data professional.

You see, the exceptional data professional hangs around the community zone at Pass Summit to help others in the community with issue they may have. The exceptional data professional sits down next to you when you are the new kid on the block and encourages you to make the most of your career then tells you some of his/her pitfalls they had that you can avoid, and the exceptional data professional takes you under his/her wing when you ask them for help or assistance.

You don’t have to travel all the way to Seattle to learn; no you have learning opportunities all around you. From SQL Saturday’s to Virtual Chapters on the web but it starts with you. That’s right, you have to be willing to take that first step; get involved and start learning.

I can tell you from experience and the roller coaster ride I’ve been on for the past three years that you will not regret it. Strive for excellence and provide that leadership through service that the community seeks. Yeah, I may be a tad passionate about what I do; you’ll find that kind of trait with others in the community.

So, I’ve challenged myself……..will you?

T-SQL Tuesday #059 – My Hero

Invitation, no roundup.

It turns out that Tuesday, October 14th, the day your contributions are due, is also Ada Lovelace Day. As you probably know, Ada Lovelace was one of the first female computer programmers (considered by many to be the FIRST computer programmer). If you didn’t know that, here’s your chance to learn some history of our industry. Wendy suggested that we take advantage of this date and do some sort of a tribute to Ada. I agreed, and here we are.

Your Assignment

Ada Lovelace has been an inspiration to many. In keeping with my blog theme, let’s call her a hero. We all have our heroes, those people who we admire, who inspire us, who we strive to be like. Who is your hero?

Your assignment is to acknowledge, in writing, your hero (or heroes). You don’t have to mention them by name if you’re not comfortable doing so, but you do have to tell us how you met them, how they have inspired you, and what qualities or traits of theirs you have striven to adopt.

T-SQL Tuesday #058 – Passwords

Invitation and roundup from Sebastian Meine.

This time the T-SQL Tuesday topic is: Passwords. Anything that you can think of, that has to do with or is related to passwords is a welcome topic. To give you a few ideas about what you could write, I compiled a short list of possible topics:

Those topics are not really SQL Server related, so you might argue that they do not fit a T-SQL Tuesday. I think that they still would make valuable posts, but in case, you want to play it “closer to home”, here are a few more ideas:

And, if you still think that “passwords” is not a fitting topic for T-SQL Tuesday, write about why you think so.

T-SQL Tuesday #057 – SQLFamily and Community

Invitation and roundup from Jeffrey Verheul.

This month I would like to give everyone the opportunity to write about SQL Family. The first time I heard of SQL Family, was on Twitter where someone mentioned this. At first I didn’t know what to think about this. I wasn’t really active in the community, and I thought it was a little weird. They were just people you meet on the internet, and might meet in person at a conference some day. But I couldn’t be more wrong about that!

Once you start visiting events, forums, or any other involvement with the community, you’ll see I was totally wrong. I want to hear those stories. How do you feel about SQL Family? Did they help you, or did you help someone in the SQL Family? I would love to hear the stories of support, how it helped you grow and evolve, or how you would explain SQL Family to your friends and family (which I find hard). Just write about whatever topic you want, as long as it’s related to SQL Family or community.